EXIT POLL: Five reflections on Ireland’s Yes

In the absence of any definitive figures, I’m going to cave in and do what I always criticise others for doing- jump to a few conclusions, engage in a bit of hyperbole and speculation and all the rest.

1. Judging by reports from several areas, Labour has finally abandoned- and been abandoned by – Ireland’s working class.

The party of Connolly said “Yes”, those who still believe in his ideals said “No”. Soon to join the PDs, and not before time, they sold out their principles so that the old guard could have one last grab for power. History will not be kind to Europe’s most right-wing worker’s movement.

2. Enda Kenny is a pathetically inept politician – but that doesn’t matter now, as we’ve ceded everything to Europe. Political history will pass a harsh judgement on Kenny’s hide-and-seek act; holder of an office already gelded by the ineptitude of his predecessors, he gave the rest away without a fight.

3. Twitter is a terrible barometer of political sentiment. It failed to adequately reflect the fear and confusion experienced by most Irish voters as they went to the polls. The yes side mostly came across as braying idealists, the nos as merchants of doom.

But worst of all were the parties themselve, and the odious ógras that polluted the timelne of every broadcast debate with scripted, inane platitudes that contributed nothing.

The born-again fervour of those in charge of the official accounts of the political parties indicates that they  clearly have no understanding of social media, or of democracy in genreal – it’s a dialogue, not a broadcast medium. And shouting your opinion is bad manners, wherever you do it.

4. Markets continue to slide, indicating the irrelevance of a Yes vote. Whereas a no vote- similar to those in genreal and presidential elections in Greece and France respectively – would have given pause for thought, we have silently acquiesced. We were essentially voting on behalf of everyone who couldn’t, and there’s a good chance we disappointed a lot of them.

5. In voting yes, we have enshrined the ideology of small government in the constitution. This is the single most damning effect of the treaty, as it limits governments in the application of Keynesian solutions to economic problems.

Despite market reaction to austerity and debt, despite Bo Lundgren (architect of the solution during Sweden’s 90s crisis) saying stimulus is a necessary as austerity, despite Nobel laureate Paul Krugman’s late statements,  we did what the neoliberal movement all over the world has envisaged, and voted to enshrine their ideology as part of our national laws.

Just as this treaty had no chance of bringing stability (check out the indifferent market reaction), the fiscal treaty itself cannot bring certainty. Different problems and different circumstances call for different  solutions- instead of having the freedom to choose from them, we have gone ahead and written the only ones proven not to work into law.

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